Filtering by: Exhibition
I do not belong
Mar
5
to Apr 6

I do not belong

MEMBERS’ VITRINE GALLERY

Christina Darras,  I do not belong , 2018, embroidery on calico fabric painted with watercolours, 20cm X 20cm,

Christina Darras, I do not belong, 2018, embroidery on calico fabric painted with watercolours, 20cm X 20cm,

I do not belong
5 March - 6 April 2019

Christina Darras

“When you arrive in a new place - whether a country, age, situation - you are so new, so undefined. Everything you used to be, you are not anymore. Your identify has to be reinvented: the language, the way of thinking, the way of feeling. You feel like a blur. Your eyes are all you have in order to survive. Look, learn, adapt. Anxiety is your state of mind. And the question pops, why do we need to belong so much somewhere? Why does the feeling of not belonging make us feel unwanted and unsafe? Why can’t we belong to nothingness, to transparency, to air, to water?

I chose calico and old kitchen cloths from my previous home, to carry the memory of the old home. Moving to the unknown is reconstructing oneself from scratch. Finding the words to use, a place to feel familiar, grow new roots and leaves and flowers, finding a place to belong.”

-

Christina Darras moved to Melbourne three years ago from Athens, Greece. She is a visual artist and jewellery designer. She studied painting at Ecole Nationale des beaux Arts in Paris, France, and printmaking at Central St Martins in London, UK and has had 20 solo exhibitions and been a part of numerous group exhibitions in Paris and London. Christina is currently collaborating with art galleries and Museums in Athens, and Melbourne.

"I don’t feel tied to a style, or that anyone has to be tied to a style in order to market his work. I feel that art is a journey to keep discovering, to keep your mind open and broaden your knowledge and potential." - Christina Darras, 2019.

christinadarras.com
@christinadarrascom

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Maree Clarke: Reimagining Culture; Contemporary Connections to Country at Mildura Arts Centre
Mar
9
to May 12

Maree Clarke: Reimagining Culture; Contemporary Connections to Country at Mildura Arts Centre

Maree Clarke,  Kangaroo Tooth Necklace,  2013. Kangaroo teeth, kangaroo leather, kangaroo sinew and pigment. Monash University Collection. Purchased by the Monash University Library 2016.

Maree Clarke, Kangaroo Tooth Necklace, 2013. Kangaroo teeth, kangaroo leather, kangaroo sinew and pigment. Monash University Collection. Purchased by the Monash University Library 2016.

Presented in association with Mildura Art Centre as part of Craft Victoria’s Craft Forward series, Reimagining Culture - Contemporary Connections to Country will bring together a selection of existing works by Mutti Mutti, Boonwurrung, Yorta Yorta woman and multi-disciplinary artist Maree Clarke, and new works made in collaboration by Maree and her nieces and nephews.

Maree’s family lives in Mildura and the surrounding area. Reimagining Culture is an opportunity for them to (re)imagine their culture in the place they live and have lived. It will explore how they create their traditions through research and respect of the land, while drawing strength from their Ancestors.

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Fresh!
Mar
23
to May 4

Fresh!

Aphra Cheesman,  Plug and Socket  ( neckpiece), 2018, vitreous enamel on copper, mild steel, electrical cable, 40x40x60 length 700mm. Photography Andrew Barcham

Aphra Cheesman, Plug and Socket ( neckpiece), 2018, vitreous enamel on copper, mild steel, electrical cable, 40x40x60 length 700mm. Photography Andrew Barcham

FRESH!
23 March - 4 May 2019


Presented annually since 1993, Fresh! showcases the energy, skill and innovation of some of the best graduating students from throughout the State practicing within craft, design and fine art disciplines. The exhibition provides an important opportunity for graduates beginning their career as makers.

This year, Craft Victoria will present eleven recent graduates selected by a team of professional craft practitioners, curators and industry experts. 

The Finalists

 Aaron Billings | Aphra Cheesman | Belinda Reid | Jess Lyons | Jessie Balletta | Javier Bermejo (Boy Mode) | Mali Taylor | Olive Gill-Hille | Rosie Gunzburg | Sam Seary | Zaiba Khan

The Selection Panel

Josephine Briginshaw | Andrei Davidoff | Troy Emery | Daniel Poole | Louise Meuwissen | Chloë Powell | Eliza Tiernan

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Conversations With A Landscape
Apr
9
to May 18

Conversations With A Landscape

MEMBERS’ VITRINE GALLERY

Robyn Phelan

Robyn Phelan

Conversations With A Landscape
9 April - 18 May 2019

Roby Phelan

Conversations With A Landscape will present an investigation into our relationship with Australian landscape.

”I have visited this area of the Victorian high country for many years. All works have been made at the site of investigation, using the pliant material of clay to capture a tangible sense of place.”

These vessels and sculptures respond to a particular eucalyptus, river and surrounding landscape. Measuring 712cm in diameter and thought to be pre-settlement, this tree has significant agency. It grows on the unceded land of the Taungurung people. It stands unharvested, majestic and sublime. A survivor of the colonial impact of saw milling, the high-country cattle industry and 19th century and ongoing farming. It stands as a provocation and reminder of longevity and undocumented history of this place.

Conversations With A Landscape proposes that we occupy a newly redefined place in nature, one that is observant and respectful. These objects explore a way of constructing and acknowledging landscape outside of colonial tropes and actions of consumption, ownership, and labelling.



Robyn Phelan makes sculptural ceramics and works out of the Elm Place Studios in North Melbourne. Ceramic objects, by their very permanence, are keepers of memories and experiences. Reference to art history, a sense of place and concern for the environment inform her work. Clay is a material that has immense agency and is intrinsic to universal human experience. Robyn’s work utilises these conceptual and material connections to ask, ‘what and who are we?’ The artist has a diverse range of professional, visual arts experience. She is a avid observer and writer of contemporary ceramic practice. Robyn's most recent study has been a degree in Ceramics at RMIT where she now teachers in Ceramics and Professional Practice.

https://robynphelan.com.au/
@robynphelan

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Crease-resistant
May
21
to Jun 22

Crease-resistant

MEMBERS’ VITRINE GALLERY

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Crease-resistant
21 May - 22 June 2019

Anna Fiedler

The weavings are made with crimplene thread, a synthetic fabric that was discontinued in the 1970s. Woven loosely, they become thin and fragile. The vacuum seal bags preserve their fragility, keeping them from being used or damaged. Removing the air from these bags emphasises each woven thread and the form of each weaving so that every movement and gesture that went into making them is highlighted.

Both are used for similar purposes, the invention of crimplene thread was to make wrinkle-free clothing that consequently did not allow your skin to breath and removing the oxygen from vacuum seal bags to keep household clothes and fabrics from creasing while in storage.

Anna Fiedler's practice utilises the process of weaving to remove the boundaries surrounding traditional craft making. Objects are created to become something no longer recognisable as a classic weaving; attempting to re-deduce their fixity between both craft and new materialism.

In size, the works often respond to the loom they were made on. This idea of a relationship between woman and loom is substantiated through the melodic and calming process of making the weavings. These works find their criticality within this process, softening differences between process and outcome. Her fragile works explore preservation but also encapsulate their history and ancient methods.

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Jun
25
to Jul 27

Time body

MEMBERS’ VITRINE GALLERY

Nora Thamthanakorn,  Time Body 2 , 2018, Earthenware Clay, 19cmWx25cmHx19cmD. Image courtesy the maker.

Nora Thamthanakorn, Time Body 2, 2018, Earthenware Clay, 19cmWx25cmHx19cmD. Image courtesy the maker.

Time Body
25 June - 27 July 2019

Nora Thamthanakorn

Time Body invites a reflection on the momentary nature of existences. It is a series of sculptural ceramic works exploring the principle of impermanence. The works are expressions of perishable conditions and that all substances are subject to continuous transformations. Interacting with this fragility, my practice has evolved to capture and bring into presence the relationship between the impermanence and life.

Perceiving erosion and architectural ruins as solid metaphors for the temporary nature of us and our surroundings, I hope to create universal visual language through recognisable forms and to recontextualise their permanent household functional values, raising mindfulness of the ephemerality we experience in our daily routine and living cycle. I hope for the works to bring into consciousness continuous changes of us and our surroundings.

Nora Thamthanakorn’s practice explores the principle of impermanence. Being self-taught, she works in clay to express the perishable conditions and the transient nature of existences. Growing up in Thailand, the Buddhist belief in Impermanence is central to her practice. As one encounters transformations through a lifetime, there are senses of uncertainty after one transition to the next. Interacting with this vulnerability, Nora aims to capture and bring into presence the relationship between the impermanence and life.

www.norathamthanakorn.com
@norathamthanakorn

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Jul
30
to Aug 31

Reverent Extrusions

MEMBERS’ VITRINE GALLERY

Jess Lyons,  Past, Present and the Before  (detail) 2018. Stoneware, Glaze. Dimensions variable. Photography Andrew Barcham

Jess Lyons, Past, Present and the Before (detail) 2018. Stoneware, Glaze. Dimensions variable. Photography Andrew Barcham

Reverent Extrusions
30 July - 31 August 2019

Jess Lyons

Reverent Extrusions looks to re-contextualise the vitrine showcase gallery as a display or archival cabinet like that within a traditional museum collection, displaying cylindrical ceramic sculptural objects.

Jess Lyons is a ceramics-based artist (currently studying the Bachelor of Fine Arts Honours at RMIT). Her practice is concerned with influences of inherited craft skills and scientific wisdom that have been passed down through her family. Transference from past to present - seepage between spaces and time - fluxus between physical states are explored in Jess’s most current research and projects. Jess’s motivation is driven by an innate desire to articulate the ‘self’ via the ceramic process - focusing on glaze development and the transformation of materials.

wivenhoeceramics.com
@wivenhoe_ceramics

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Flourish
Sep
3
to Oct 5

Flourish

MEMBERS’ VITRINE GALLERY

Ailsa Morrant,  The value is in the connection  (brooch), 2018, Copper, brass, silver, 9ct gold, 60mm x 10mm x 10mm. Photo credits Ailsa Morrant


Ailsa Morrant, The value is in the connection (brooch), 2018, Copper, brass, silver, 9ct gold, 60mm x 10mm x 10mm. Photo credits Ailsa Morrant

Flourish
3 September - 5 October 2019

Curated by Michelle Stewart

Artists : Adrienn Pesti, Ailsa Morrant,Astrid Jaroslawsky, Caitlin Hegney, Rachel Hardie and Michelle Stewart.


An observation of commonality through diversity that emerges from shared experience.

Six emerging artists have gathered in the shifting milieu of Scotland’s largest city and spent a year working alongside one another in the Glasgow School of Art, Artist in Residence program. Each with a clear focus in mind and a personal direction to navigate and each bringing their own experiences and perspectives. From a deep ancestral belonging in the Glasgow Arts and comfortable familiarity of an adopted home to fresh eyes on an old city, these artists all have a way of interpreting this place that echoes the ingenuity and innovation of the Scots. With daily visual cues from a city that boasts an architectural tenacity of the ages, an undercurrent of resilience and strength of character embodies their work.

Each of the artists are recently graduated and have been accepted into the Glasgow School of Art (GSA) Artist in Residence (AiR) 2018-2019 program. Still within the supportive environment of the GSA but each taking a step towards an independent arts practice these artists are working hard to explore and define themselves in their work. The surrounding environment of Glasgow city and the renewal, yet again, of the beloved Mackintosh Building are reflected in the pieces developed during their tenure. The Artists are Adrienn Pesti, Ailsa Morrant, Astrid Jaroslawsky, Caitlin Hegney, Rachel Hardie and Michelle Stewart.

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Small Gatherings
Oct
8
to Nov 9

Small Gatherings

MEMBERS’ VITRINE GALLERY

Stephanie Hicks,  Sampler II  (detail), 2019, collage, 58 x 38cm. Image courtesy of the artist

Stephanie Hicks, Sampler II (detail), 2019, collage, 58 x 38cm. Image courtesy of the artist

Small Gatherings
8 October - 9 November 2019

Stephanie Hicks


Small Gatherings is a continuation of work that originated during my residency at Craft in August last year. Over several weeks, I collected, cut out and rearranged photographs sourced from the library at Craft to develop a series of works on paper: collage ‘samplers’ created with the specific intention of application to fabric.

The initial phase of this project was guided in part by my aim to extend my creative practice into textile design. It also allowed me to explore an ongoing interest in materiality and assemblage.

Whilst repetitive processes are often central to my thinking, I’m intrigued by the distinction that Zoe Leonard makes between repetition and seriality:

"Repetition is doing or making exactly the same thing, over and over again. I think of seriality as making or doing something from the same starting point, but each time allowing for a slightly different result."

With this in mind I undertook a series of open-ended investigations, utilizing a variety of materials and objects, both found and handmade, and taking into consideration a range of formal concerns, but always referring back to the collage samplers as a starting point.

Stephanie Hicks is a visual artist working across collage, drawing, artists’ books and installation. Her practice is informed by traditions of printmaking, craft and decorative arts, and a love of picture books and storytelling. The collection and arrangement of photographic images is central to Stephanie’s creative practice. Images from vintage books and journals, found photographs and stickers are incorporated into a personal archive in which meaning is articulated though the use of formal qualities such as patterning, repetition and symmetry.

stephaniehicks.com.au
@stephaniefhicks

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Nanakorobi Yaoki
Nov
12
to Dec 14

Nanakorobi Yaoki

MEMBERS’ VITRINE GALLERY

Elysha Rei,  Wagara I (detail) , 2019 Handcut paper. 45 x 104cm

Elysha Rei, Wagara I (detail), 2019 Handcut paper. 45 x 104cm

Nanakorobi Yaoki - Fall down seven times, get up eight
12 November - 14 December 2019

Elysha Rei


These works form part of a body of work created and exhibited in Japan in December 2018, as part of an Asialink Creative Exchange. The work features hand cut paper installations inspired by the patterns found in Rei's Samurai ancestor's armour-wear, which took on additional meaning when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2017, becoming a warrior herself. The works illuminate the patterns of Rei's mixed Japanese-Australian heritage, and pay homage to her battle with breast cancer.

Elysha Rei is a Japanese-Australian visual artist whose work draws upon her mixed heritage and lived experiences between places, cultures and communities. Her works are created from personal and historical archives which embed narrative and symbolism within a Japanese design aesthetic. Works include portraits, patterns and paper cutting which have been translated into large-scale murals and public art commissions. Since completing a Bachelor of Visual Arts in 2008, Rei has created and exhibited work, curated exhibitions and managed cultural spaces across Australia, New Zealand,Thailand, Japan and the US. In November 2018 she completed an Asialink Arts Creative Exchange in Japan creating work at Studio Kura in Fukuoka, then exhibited at No.12 Gallery in Tokyo.

elysharei.com
@elysharei


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100 Models
Mar
16
to Mar 20

100 Models

100 Models_Cover.jpg

100 Models is an exhibition by BKK Architects celebrating new modes of digital thinking: a creative process made possible through the arrival of affordable and accessible 3D printing. 100 ideas are frozen in physical form as unpolished experiments, provocations, an follies, drawn from an eclectic mix of influence: Culture, technology, science, philosophy, politics and urban form. Processed by the network of thinking within a practice, the 100 ideas overlap in a unique expression of collective design intelligence

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 Floor talk with Catherine Truman
Feb
2
12:00 PM12:00

Floor talk with Catherine Truman

Catherine Truman,  In Preparation for Seeing: SEM Glove Installation,  2015, black cotton glove encrusted with black glass spheres, mircoscope slides, steel forceps, petri dishes, light pad. Dimensions variable. Photo: Grant Hancock

Catherine Truman, In Preparation for Seeing: SEM Glove Installation, 2015, black cotton glove encrusted with black glass spheres, mircoscope slides, steel forceps, petri dishes, light pad. Dimensions variable. Photo: Grant Hancock

With a 35-year practice that covers film to public artworks to intricate carvings, ‘Jeweller’ as Catherine Truman is sometimes referred to, hardly embraces the true expanse of her practice. Rather, she is an accomplished artist, with a love of research flowing in the undercurrent to all of her practice, a practice that is of and about the body as much as it is intended for it.

Join Catherine among her exhibition JamFactory ICON: Catherine Truman: no surface holds for a reflection on her work and practice.

Please book below as space is limited.

Name *
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situation gravitas
Jan
29
to Mar 2

situation gravitas

MEMBERS’ VITRINE GALLERY

Pie_Bolton_cube_drop_collection_1_2019_ceramic_glaze_lustre_various80mmx80mmx20mm_.jpg

situation gravitas cube drop, 2019, ceramic, glaze, lustre, various approx 80 x 80 x 20. Image courtesy the maker

situation gravitas
29 January - 2 March 2019

Pie Bolton


situation gravitas
considers gravity and the force of attraction between objects. Through the repetitive act of dropping moist clay from a height of 5 metres, Bolton experiments with ‘release, velocity and impact’ to build forms that interrogate ideas surrounding geological change.

Gravity is considered a ‘field of influence’ controlling the motion of an object. My PhD research at RMIT involves practice-based enquiry into humanity as a geological ‘field of influence’. Conceptually, by utilising the earth’s force of gravity to create this work, I interrogate ideas about geological change imposed on the earth by humanity through continued extraction and exploitation.

The title ‘situation gravitas’ is a play on the word ‘gravity’ as the ‘earth force’, ‘gravity’ as in ‘the gravity of the situation’ referring to an event of extreme seriousness, and the word ‘gravitas’ referring to weight, seriousness and commitment to task.”


-

Pie Bolton is a contemporary installation artist working at the human/geological interface. Her practice is grounded in materiality and temporality. She uses transformation of geological processes to expand ideas about humanity as a geological force. Tertiary studies in art and science (geology) have resulted in Pie’s unique, authoritative practice. Innovative objects and installations are backed up by sound research and technical expertise to assist the development of a clearer understanding of the complex relations between the human and nonhuman. Pie has worked as a field exploration geologist, is an experienced ceramic technician and a PhD candidate at RMIT.

                                                             

www.piebolton.com

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JamFactory ICON: Catherine Truman: no surface holds
Jan
19
to Mar 9

JamFactory ICON: Catherine Truman: no surface holds

Catherine Truman,  No Surface Holds: Crab Claw Installation , 2015-17. Objects: found crab claws encrusted with glass spheres. Dimensions variable. Photo: Grant Hancock

Catherine Truman, No Surface Holds: Crab Claw Installation, 2015-17. Objects: found crab claws encrusted with glass spheres. Dimensions variable. Photo: Grant Hancock

“As an artist I have learnt that making things with my hands leaves me with much less of a sense of dislocation from the world I live in - and this I feel, is an interesting premise from which to examine the world of science.” - Catherine Truman

Internationally renowned for her contemporary jewellery, no surface holds explores the breadth of Catherine Truman's research-based practice, bringing together an extraordinary collection of film, images, installation and sculpture.

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Nov
24
to Jan 12

Clarity

Kath Inglis,  Spark  cuff, 2018. Hand cut Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC). Photo: Craig Arnold

Kath Inglis, Spark cuff, 2018. Hand cut Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC). Photo: Craig Arnold

Clarity
24 November 2018 - 12 January 2019
Jessica Loughlin, Kirsten Coelho, Kath Inglis, and Lindy McSwan


Mystification is simple; clarity is the hardest thing of all.
- Julian Barnes


Honouring the calm strength of a clear voice, Clarity brings together the work of four Australian artists - Jessica Loughlin (glass), Kirsten Coelho (ceramics), Kath Inglis (jewellery), and Lindy McSwan (metal).

Working in different craft disciplines, they share the rare ability to distil an idea into form, and an understanding of material that allows them to express that idea with conviction and humility.

It takes courage to make work this honest. There’s nowhere to hide here. Each work stands calm, peaceful, resolved. Nothing can be added, nothing can be removed. Yet their apparent simplicity belies the years of learning, deep contemplation, and rich material knowledge of their maker.

There is so much noise in the world, so much vying for our attention, it can be hard to filter through it all; to focus on what matters. Here, in this room, are works that allow and invite contemplation and rest.

A moment of clarity.

A ringing truth.

- Chloë Powell, Curator

 

Opening Event Thursday 29 November 2018, 6 - 8pm
To be opened by Katie Scott, Director of Gallery Funaki

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smother talk
Nov
14
1:00 PM13:00

smother talk

Join us for an open panel discussion in the gallery amidst the current exhibition “smother” at Craft.

A conversation about the intersection of feminism, making and motherhood. 

How do we construct and make our ideas – whether it be jewellery, photographs, structures or words?  How does the body and our politics inform this?  How, indeed, is feminism crafted?

·         Tiffany Parbs
conceptual based jeweller

·         Karen Pickering
feminist presenter, writer and educator

·         Gemma Jones
Public Programs Manager, Craft

Tiffany Parbs,  gnash , 2018,porcelain teeth, sterling silver enamel paint, giclée print on aluminium, 50 x 125 x 25mm object, 470 x 340 x 12mm print. Photography Tobias Titz

Tiffany Parbs, gnash, 2018,porcelain teeth, sterling silver enamel paint, giclée print on aluminium, 50 x 125 x 25mm object, 470 x 340 x 12mm print. Photography Tobias Titz

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Nov
13
to Dec 15

Three Trees

Cara Johnson,  creek , 2016. crack willow, iron, paper. Image Jeremy Dillon

Cara Johnson, creek, 2016. crack willow, iron, paper. Image Jeremy Dillon

Three Trees
13 November - 15 December
Cara Johnson

One of the penalties of an ecological education is that one lives alone in a world of wounds.

- Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac

Three Trees looks to narrate fraught and fragile human relationships to trees through material choices and making processes.

Willow, classed as a ‘Weed of National Significance’ has been harvested and carved to reflect and mourn past mistakes, that have caused irreconcilable damage. Agricultural debris and old plastic tree guards present a way to consider current conservation and regeneration efforts and the complexities of our impact on the environment.

The exhibition responds to three individual trees, and through highly involved making processes, seeks to heighten their importance.

-


Cara Johnson completed a Bachelor of Fine Art (First Class Honours) at RMIT University in 2016. She resides in the Otways in Victoria’s southwest, and is a PhD Candidate at RMIT where she is examining narratives of land management, through a craft based practice.

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MASCOTS
Oct
9
to Nov 10

MASCOTS

Cat Rabbit and Andrea Innocent,  TELEPHANT.  Image courtesy the artists

Cat Rabbit and Andrea Innocent, TELEPHANT. Image courtesy the artists

Mascots
9 October - 10 November 2018
Cat Rabbit and Andrea Innocent

Cat Rabbit, known for her plush characters who inspire good feelings, and Andrea Innocent, known for her character design and emotive illustrations, have come together to create a series of ‘Everyday Anxieties Mascots’. Each mascot, supports a particular feeling/mood/anxiety produced by modern living and the human condition. Held in an (as yet) imaginary expo of mascots, these characters inhabit different realms of anxieties and function as a talisman to those who find the world overwhelming and confusing at times. Let’s face it, that's most of us.

Our various characters include the 'Telephant' mascot for those of us who feel fear and dread when the phone rings, when it feels like every ping of our device is another demand on our time and attention and is frankly draining our very life force. The ‘I’d rather be with my pets’ mascot for those of us who experience agoraphobia - maybe you have actually left the house to go to a social event and are at a party talking to someone you really don’t know and wishing they were as interesting as your sleeping cat but instead they are experts at boring chit chat. Juniper the King Parrot is also here to soothe the heart ache of existential angst and loneliness. No small feat but isn’t it nice to know he’s got your back at 2am when the world seems a relentless machine. There is no judgement here just lots of cuddles, hand holding and waving, they are all on your side.

The mascots will greet you at the entrance of Craft Victoria, in the snug vitrine space, acting as bouncers to bad feelings. They are the perfect size to sit on your shoulder and whisper in your ear ‘it’s gonna be ok’.

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Sea HER LAND
Oct
6
to Nov 10

Sea HER LAND

Beverly Meldrum, (detail)  Washed Up,  2018, ghost net, bailing twine, shark vertebrae, fishing line, kelp, 190 x 170 x 150mm. Photography Fred Kroh

Beverly Meldrum, (detail) Washed Up, 2018, ghost net, bailing twine, shark vertebrae, fishing line, kelp, 190 x 170 x 150mm. Photography Fred Kroh

Curated by Lisa Waup Sea HER Land emanates strong cultural ties to individual stories and complex interconnections. Through the collecting of materials from places lived or travelled to, examining them, and finding considered new uses, these strong Indigenous women identify with their heritage and reclaim and reignite their innate cultural expression.  This collection of works explores both the protective and nurturing role of nature, and the ancient practice of using elements from the natural world to create diverse works as a rich expression of culture, identity, and place that links generations together.

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smother
Oct
6
to Nov 17

smother

Tiffany Parbs,  nullify,  2015, 22kt gold leaf, thermoplastic, giclée print on aluminium, 470 x 340 x 12mm. Photography Tobias Titz

Tiffany Parbs, nullify, 2015, 22kt gold leaf, thermoplastic, giclée print on aluminium, 470 x 340 x 12mm. Photography Tobias Titz

smother forms part of a larger body of research by Tiffany Parbs, examining contrary frameworks used to depict women in the media, their psychological impact on individuals and pervasive influence on socialisation of attitudes towards women in the wider populace.

With this instalment, Tiffany uses jewellery to reframe the prevailing good/bad mother dichotomy, with particular emphasis on the gap between visceral realities of motherhood and the gamut of unrealistic expectations placed on women from ‘Ideal Mother’ myths pervading through Western advertising that promote happiness through procreation, autonomic nurturing perfection and unattainable standards.

smother offers an alternative reference point - one that revels and reveres in mundanity and demonstrates a heightened awareness of ongoing psychological and physical states of mothering, the involved labour and loading of parenting.

Opening Event: Thursday 11 October

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Deeper: Ceramics by David Pottinger
Sep
1
to Sep 29

Deeper: Ceramics by David Pottinger

David Pottinger Close up of Porcelain Nerikomi Vessel#4.JPG

David Pottinger, Porcelain Nerikomi Vessels (detail), 2018. Photo: Tim Gresham.

Deeper:
Ceramics by David Pottinger

1 - 29 September 2018

My work is an exploration of form through the interplay of colour, tension, rhythm, and pattern in porcelain, utilising the ancient technique of Nerikomi.

One of Australia's foremost ceramic artists, David Pottinger presents a new body of work in the exhibition Deeper.

Through the meticulous and meditative layering and slicing of hand-coloured porcelain, David creates hand-built vessels that bring to mind natural landscapes and sedimentary rocks. The intricate patterns draw you in, asking you to look deeper in peaceful reflection.

Entry Free


Opening Event: Thursday 6 September, 6 - 8pm

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Shinki Burning Vessel
Aug
25
to Sep 29

Shinki Burning Vessel

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Shinki (Burning Vessel)

25 August - 29 September

Makiko Ryujin

Shinki (Burning Vessel) draws from ceremonies Makiko Ryujin took part in while growing up in Japan and is concerned with the uncontrolled transformative nature of fire. 

'The change that is bought to the bowls by fire is in stark contrast to the controlled transformation from wood to bowl on the lathe', explains Makiko. 'After spending many hours working the wood into the bowl, I then must release control to fire and let go of the shape that I have created, welcoming whatever the burning brings to the vessel.'

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Teapot
Aug
15
to Sep 22

Teapot

‘Full’ Teapot, Yoko Ozawa, image Craft

‘Full’ Teapot, Yoko Ozawa, image Craft

TEAPOT 

15 August - 22 September

Whether functional or sculptural, each teapot possesses its own identity. Appearing across many cultures throughout the centuries, this well-known form has seen numerous interpretations and has left an indelible mark on the history of the world. 

From the elaborate to the minimal – this showcase at Craft presents the teapots of over fifteen contemporary craftspeople working across a diversity of discipline. 

Featuring the works of makers Janet Beckhouse, Adriana Christianson, Nicola Coady, Andrei Davidoff, Minna Graham, Wayne Guest, Tessy King, Sai-Wai Foo, Vanessa Lucas, Yoko Ozawa, Christopher Plumridge, Ted Secombe, Kevin Boyd, William Eicholtz and Pee Bear (Vipoo Srivilasa) working across a diversity of material in this new showcase. 

 

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Memories of Landscape
Jul
31
to Oct 6

Memories of Landscape

Jill Symes,  Heart of Gold,  2018 (View#1). Image courtesy the artist

Jill Symes, Heart of Gold, 2018 (View#1). Image courtesy the artist

Memories of Landscape
31 July - 6 October
Jill Symes

“Inspired by years of travel in the outback and coastal areas, my practice explores the forms of the Australian landscape.

Through the use of handcrafting methods I am able to feel the tactility and natural rhythm within the clay. When the finished form is dry, porcelain slips coloured with oxides and stains are painted onto the surface. The firing and final glazing reveals the layers of colour and movement in the work, achieving a tactile combination of soft lines, natural curves and a sense of immediacy.

Works from old to new are presented together as punctuated moments and “memories of landscape.”

Jill Symes is a Melbourne-based ceramic artist producing a continuously developing body of distinctive ceramic works which demonstrate developed handbuilding skills and a mature understanding of the exciting possibilities of earthenware clays and glazing techniques.

Symes has an intensive national and international presence spanning the past 30 years. Exhibitions include but are not limited to Women in the Whitehorse Art Collection 2018, Victorian Craft Award 2015, Big Ceramics 2014 (Craft sponsored exhibition in Federation Square), Moments in Time 2014 (Kerrie Lowe Gallery, Sydney), Fragments of Landscape (Kazari Collector, Melbourne 2010), Impressed, Contemporary Australian Ceramics (2006, New Delhi Pottery, India). Her work is in numerous public and private collections, Australia- wide and world-wide, and recent commissions include limited edition sculptures for the NGV Design Store.

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SARAH CROWEST - MATERIAL CONSTRUCTS: THE HOME STRETCH at Ararat Gallery TAMA
Jul
18
to Oct 28

SARAH CROWEST - MATERIAL CONSTRUCTS: THE HOME STRETCH at Ararat Gallery TAMA

Sarah crowEST,  Beaten and Left for Dead  (detail) 2013 - 2018, linen, synthetic polymer paint, 254 x 218 cm

Sarah crowEST, Beaten and Left for Dead (detail) 2013 - 2018, linen, synthetic polymer paint, 254 x 218 cm

Presented in association with Ararat Gallery TAMA as part of Craft's Craft Forward series, Material Constructs: The Home Stretch features new work by Sarah crowEST, in response to two earlier textile artworks acquired from the artist in 1995 and 2013. A leader and innovator in textile art, crowEST's work operates in the gaps between geometric abstraction, hand-crafted apparel and the expanded field of 'painting'.

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Small Victories
Jun
26
to Jul 28

Small Victories

Kirsty Macafee,  Small Victories , 2018. Image courtesy the artist

Kirsty Macafee, Small Victories, 2018. Image courtesy the artist

VITRINE GALLERY

Small Victories

26 June - 28 July

Kirsty Macafee

Through actions of tension and balance, Small Victories explores the relationship between contemporary women and ‘the glass ceiling.’

The hand spun thread used throughout the installation appropriates the words of contemporary women in positions of leadership. Once printed, the text is hand spun on a drop spindle to create a reformatted image thread. The thread negotiates perspex obstacles, necessarily bending to accommodate the barriers while gently testing the boundaries of a supportive exhibition space.

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Kirsty Macafee lives and works in Melbourne. Her work is mostly sculptural and often engaged in themes of loss and abundance as she explores parallels between the way that images function in a digital networked culture and being. Kirsty’s practice is engaged in post-photographic and feminist maternal discourses. She draws on her multiple histories as crafter, mother and photographer and finds her practice at the intersection of these influences – seeking to reveal the invisible. Recently she has been selected as a finalist in the 2017 Contemporary Textile Award, the 2017 Victorian Craft Awards and was commissioned to make work for the Museum of Australian Democracy.

Kirsty graduated from RMIT with first class honours in 2016.

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Baluk Arts Sea HER Land at Benalla Art Gallery
Jun
23
to Aug 26

Baluk Arts Sea HER Land at Benalla Art Gallery

Beverley Meldrum,  Washed up , 2018, ghost net, bailing twine, shark vertebrae, fishing line, kelp, 190 x 170 x 150cm. Photo_Fred Kroh

Beverley Meldrum, Washed up, 2018, ghost net, bailing twine, shark vertebrae, fishing line, kelp, 190 x 170 x 150cm. Photo_Fred Kroh

Sea HER Land
23 June - 26 August, 2018

Curated by Lisa Waup and Baluk Arts.

Inspired by this year’s 2018 NAIDOC theme ‘Because of Her, We Can’, this exhibition Sea HER Land showcases a rich quality and diverse range of works made entirely from natural materials by six of Baluk Arts’ key female Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists, Tallara Gray, Cassie Leatham, Gillian Garvie, Beverley Meldrum, Nannette Shaw & Lisa Waup. Exquisite works made from materials such as bull kelp, shells, bones, clay, wool, wood, assorted fibres, river reed and feathers honour mother earth and evoke memories of personal history. Each artist has a strong connection to the material they have utilised in their work, whether it be from the sea or the land. It is HER story, which has been cradled in the form of a vessel, to encapsulate the essence of protection and strength.

Curated by Lisa Waup Sea Her Land emanates strong cultural ties to individual stories and complexed interconnections. Through the collecting of materials from places lived or travelled to, examining them, and finding considered new uses, these strong Indigenous women identify with their heritage and reclaim and reignite their innate cultural expression.  This collection of works explores both the protective and nurturing role of nature, and the ancient practice of using elements from the natural world to create diverse works as a rich expression of culture, identity and place that links generations together.

OPENING INVITATION
Join the Baluk artists, Craft Victoria and Benalla Art Gallery representatives to celebrate the exhibition opening.

Saturday July 14, 3 - 4.30pm

Guest speakers: Jane Smith, CEO Craft Victoria; Lisa Waup, Sea HER Land curator
RSVP to Benalla Art Gallery by July 9 on 03 5760 2619 or email gallery@benalla.vic.gov.au


 
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Island Welcome
Jun
2
to Jun 30

Island Welcome

Kath Inglis,  A Lei from the welcome mat , 2017, used thongts, silk thread, sterling silver, patina. Photo: Kathe Inglis

Kath Inglis, A Lei from the welcome mat, 2017, used thongts, silk thread, sterling silver, patina. Photo: Kathe Inglis

ISLAND WELCOME

Exhibition: 2 - 30 JUNE 2018
Exhibition opening: Thursday 7 June, 6 - 8pm

Alice Whish, Anna Davern, Belinda Newick, Jane Bowden, Jess Dare, Kath Inglis, Lauren Simeoni, Liv Boyle, Manon van Kouswijk, Maree Clarke, Melinda Young, Michelle Cangiano, Nicky Hepburn, Sim Luttin & Vicki Mason

Curated by Belinda Newick

Island Welcome is a group exhibition exploring contemporary jewellery as a gesture of greeting. Inspired by the welcome garland found in many traditional island cultures, the artists have each made a neckpiece interpreting the theme of ‘welcome' in response to current Australian immigration and refugee policy.

This builds on the exhibition shown as part of Radiant Pavilion 2017, with six new artists contributing to the conversation.

Craft will mark World Refugee Day with two events on Wednesday 20 June.

The exhibition will be opened by Jana Favero, Director – Advocacy and Campaigns, Asylum Seeker Resource Centre on Thursday 7 June, 6 - 8pm. 

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Lights Out
Jun
2
to Jun 30

Lights Out

Ruth Allen,  Black Beauty.  Image courtesy the artist

Ruth Allen, Black Beauty. Image courtesy the artist

LIGHTS OUT

Showcasing A.C.V. Studio, Ruth Allen, and Jonathan Ben-Tovim

Lights Out celebrates three Victorian designer makers exploring contemporary lighting through their unique choices in material and form.

 A.C.V studio is the project of artist Anna Varendorff.  Formally trained as a metalsmith Anna handmakes limited edition objects embracing the natural beauty of brass.

Ruth Allen is a Melbourne based multi-media artist primarily working with glass, light and kinetics. 

Jonathan Ben-Tovim designs range from lights to furniture, all handmade to order. His creative approach explores a variety of materials and processes whilst not compromising on how design should fit into people’s lives.

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Ancient Echoes... Future Visions
May
22
to Jun 23

Ancient Echoes... Future Visions

Image | Ancient Echoes...Future Visions. Image courtesy the artists. Stones kindly on loan from the  Dandenong Lapidary Club

Image | Ancient Echoes...Future Visions. Image courtesy the artists. Stones kindly on loan from the Dandenong Lapidary Club

VITRINE GALLERY

Ancient Echoes...Future Visions
22 May - 23 June 2018

Alice Chalmers, Anica Costa and Fiona Fitzgerald

Memories from the past can be confronting, intriguing, awe inspiring, and act as a great catalyst for healing.

How we process and learn from them in this life can challenge and inspire us to forge something new.

Shaped by the generations and lives that came before, we often create in response to cycles of life, death and rebirth, from both the ancient and the expanse of unlimited possibility; our future visions.

Focusing on how the sun and moon have inspired ancient civilisations over eons as custodians of these cycles, this body of work is a modern representation of these primordial forces.


Influenced by astrology and other esoteric systems, Alice Chalmers’ contemplative approach to hand crafting jewellery imbues each piece with its own unique and tangible spirit. Originally having a background in illustration and watercolour, distilled line and symbology feature heavily, creating the sense of having captured something expansive.

“I am interested in how we invest meaning in objects, how we put a feeling into something we can touch. There is something alchemical in the process of making that lives on within the item. I make for those who might find resonance with some part of that magic.”

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Traversing the infinite, Anica Costa’s work explores the intersection of the fantastical, the ancient and the far reaching futures. Her elegant and earthy pieces are the product of her affinity with the natural world.  Embracing past lives, the sun and moon speak to her through archaic echoes and future visions. Evoking the adornments of ancient civilisations and fantasy realms, her hand crafted creations aim to bring a sense of wonder and adventure.

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Borne from past life memories and experiences gained as an energetic healer, Fiona Fitzgerald’s jewellery is symbolic of the exploration of once splintered facets.

Seeking to restore lightness and counterbalance the often solemn nature of healing, each piece represents a point in time, acceptance, making whole and way for the new.
In opposition to the sentimentality often associated with jewellery, Fiona’s work is created to respect passage and release.

“I’m interested in the elaborate, transformative and storytelling qualities of jewellery, it’s weight as an observer, companion and almost epibiont in the life of it’s wearer.”

 

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This is not Memphis
Apr
28
to May 26

This is not Memphis

This is not Memphis

Adam Markowitz,  Assegai Pendant ,  Fred table,  and  Flea chair . Photo: Ben Clement. Styling: Tamara Maynes. Ceramics: Cone11

Adam Markowitz, Assegai Pendant, Fred table, and Flea chair. Photo: Ben Clement. Styling: Tamara Maynes. Ceramics: Cone11

Adam Markowitz, Bern Chandley, Bryan Cush, Damien Wright, Daniel Poole, and Laura McCusker

It’s no secret, no new idea that we live in a fast-paced world. Bombarded with an endless stream of visual stimuli we seek an anchor in what is familiar, creating an ongoing cycle of the same image, the same object, re-styled and re-presented. This familiarity comes to stand for quality and worth, and as a consequence something valuable is lost.

Craftsmanship is a language. It speaks of techniques distilled and refined through process and time; profound material knowledge combined with resourcefulness and adaptability; and a deep respect for the role these objects play in our lives.

Here is furniture that honours the power of the lived object. Respecting the past this work stands firmly in the present, and looks passionately to the future. It tells stories of concepts born in wood, and crafted by hands that speak fluently. It is made to live with, and to live well. It is unapologetically made to last.

“Our work is about an authenticity that can be tested by the metrics of skill, discipline, time, process, ingenuity, virtuosity and beauty.  It demands a connection between the head, the heart, the hand, and the land. And it stands its ground against a complacency and complicity in consumption and waste in our culture.

We believe that intellectual and physical quality matter equally. Making and designing are one.  This is our vision of what it means to design and make in this country right now.”

ENTRY FREE

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Gallery Two: SKIN by Lauralai Wilson
Apr
25
to May 26

Gallery Two: SKIN by Lauralai Wilson

Skin, 2018, by Lauralai Wilson, image courtesy the artist

Skin, 2018, by Lauralai Wilson, image courtesy the artist

Winner of the Retail and Development award in 2017’s Fresh! exhibition and recipient of the McCraith Scholarship in Fine Art , jeweller and object maker Lauralai Wilson returns to Craft with a solo exhibition of new works which respond to heartbreak and an exploration of what comes afterwards.

‘In nature, organisms adapt their morphology in the face of change. Working through jewellery I consider the adaptations we are able to make within our own skins. I stitch growth and progression into surfaces, making works that transform and protect the wearer. Skin is an expression of strength, sensuality, loss, vulnerability, surrender and awakening.’ – Lauralai Wilson

Graduating from Gold and Silversmithing at RMIT in 2016, Lauralai’s practice is led by considered explorations of stone, sand, silicone and silver along with adaptations of raw minerals, and alterations of surface and form through chemical synthesis. Her work aims to dispel the lacklustre nature of routine, to provide the viewer or wearer with a temporary escapism and a connection to the otherworld present in their psyche, imagination or memory.

image: Skin, 2018, by Lauralai Wilson, image courtesy the artist

ENTRY FREE

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Vipoo Srivilasa Everyday Shrines at Gippsland Art Gallery
Mar
31
to Jun 17

Vipoo Srivilasa Everyday Shrines at Gippsland Art Gallery

Peace Together,  2017, by Vipoo Srivalasa, image courtesy the artist

Peace Together, 2017, by Vipoo Srivalasa, image courtesy the artist

Presented in association with Craft as part of their Craft Forward series, Everyday Shrines features fourteen new works, together with an earlier work acquired for the Gallery collection in 2015.

Some works included in the exhibition, such as Coat of Arms and Land of Success, shine a spotlight on national pride and Australian values, while Tree Nymph and Beckoning Kangaroo present a strange mash-up of Australian and Asian symbology. Srivilasa’s sculptures are both extraordinarily beautiful and present a humorous commentary on our everyday society.

 

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Northcity4 - 14 Benches
Mar
15
to Apr 21

Northcity4 - 14 Benches

Northcity4 - 14 Benches

Federleicht, by Flavia Barar, Image courtesy the artist

Federleicht, by Flavia Barar, Image courtesy the artist

Curated by Anna Gray

This March, Gallery Two at Craft showcases the work of 14 contemporary jewellers from the highly regarded warehouse studio Northcity4. Founded in 2011, this sustainability focused, Artist led studio space supports independent jewellery businesses through permanent and short term tenancies.

With the collaborative nature of the shared workshop space in mind, this exhibition acknowledges the value of community to creative work and explores the inspirations driving individual artistic practices.

Anna Davern, Annelies Hofmeyr, Jin Ah Jo, Emma Grace, Laila Marie Costa, Juan Castro, Flavia Barar, Georgie Brooks, Anna Gray, Ali Limb, Amanda Croatto, Cass Partington, Mehrnoosh Ganji and Pamela Camille

ENTRY FREE

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Vanguard: Contemporary makers using new technologies
Mar
15
to Apr 21

Vanguard: Contemporary makers using new technologies

VANGUARD: CONTEMPORARY MAKERS USING NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Alterfact,  The Strip , 2017, dimensions variable

Alterfact, The Strip, 2017, dimensions variable

 

Image: Alterfact, The Strip, 2017, dimensions variable, courtesy the artists

VANGUARD: CONTEMPORARY MAKERS USING NEW TECHNOLOGIES

Exhibition Dates: Thursday 15 March – Saturday 21 April 2018
Afternoon in Conversation: Saturday 17 March 2 - 3 pm

Opening event:  Saturday 17 March, 3 – 5 pm

ENTRY FREE

Combining craft philosophies, methodologies and materials with new and existing technologies, Alterfact, Bin Dixon-Ward, and Michaela Pegum are at the forefront of exciting developments in contemporary craft practice.

Through their experimental and sensitive approach to making, these artists are creating new materials, expanding the possibilities of various technologies, and contributing to a new interpretation of the handmade in craft.

ARTIST BIOS:

Alterfact is an experimental design studio created by Lucile Sciallano and Ben Landau. Alterfact’s practice is currently focused on the use of 3D printing in clay as a small batch manufacturing process. They push the boundaries of this traditionally plastic-based medium, and play with its connotations of utilitarianism and gimmickry, as it moves into a feasible reality. 

Bin Dixon-Ward uses CAD and 3D printing to explore the links between the geometry of buildings and contemporary jewellery. She references architectural elements in her work, explaining “I am using the same tools that are used to design buildings to design jewellery but on a different scale”.

Through phenomenological, poetic and material investigations Michaela Pegum’s current work explores experiences that hover on the thresholds of knowledge and mystery and how these experiences can be expressed in material form. She is particularly interested in in the resonance that is created between art object and beholder, and the generation of new and unique materials.

Craft Watson Place (off Flinders Lane behind Supernormal) Melbourne, VIC, 3000 Australia 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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