Troy Emery,  lilac layabout, pink bandit beast, second lump , 2018, polyester, polyurethane, pins, adhesive, various dimensions. Photo_Fred Kroh

Troy Emery, lilac layabout, pink bandit beast, second lump, 2018, polyester, polyurethane, pins, adhesive, various dimensions. Photo_Fred Kroh

ENTRY FREE

Opening:  Thursday 12 July, 6 - 8pm

The exhibition will be opened by Louis Le Vaillant , Director & Curator of The Johnston Collection

Click below button to read Louis' opening speech


Afternoon Tea with the Makers: Friday 17 August, 1 - 3pm

Join Troy Emery along with Tai SnaithStephanie Hicks and Rute Chaves from our Artist in Residence Project for tea, coffee, cake and conversation.

This is a free event. Please RSVP via following link 

 

Images of the opening event, coming soon!

night vision

by Troy Emery

7 July - 18 August


At once friendly and unnerving, Troy Emery’s mythological creatures play with our imagination, creating a psychedelic, dream-like environment in which our perceptions are blurred. We’re left unsure but at ease, curious yet wary.

Reflecting on the role of animals in our culture, their alluring pelts amplify our desire for the decorative, as he says, in “a camp interpretation of the way skins and furs are cherished and fetishised”. Further subverting our ideals, Troy’s use of mass-produced ‘craft’ materials challenges their prescribed value in creating artworks of wonder and magic.

Troy Emery is an artist based in Melbourne and has an art practice encompassing sculpture, painting, drawing, and embroidery. He refers to his sculptures as ‘fake taxidermy’ because they mimic the process of taxidermy without actually producing a real result. The particular animals he chooses to work with fall between being exotic and easily recognisable. 

Troy’s work is held in various private and public collections, including The National Gallery of Victoria, Art Bank Australia Collection, City of Townsville Art Collection, Goulburn Regional Art Gallery Collection, and Deacon Art Museum. Troy is represented by Martin Browne Contemporary Gallery in Sydney.