Blanche Tilden

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01_blanche_tilden_graded_palais_necklace_2014_image_credit_grant_hancock-1020x1280.jpg

Blanche Tilden

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EXHIBITED WORK
Graded Palais Necklace
borosilicate glass, oxidised 925 silver
4.2 x 38cm
$4,840

ARTIST STATEMENT
The history of technology, mechanical movement, the built environment and modern architecture continually inspire Blanche Tilden. Her innovative approach to glass as a material for jewellery and focus on the power of repeating elements draws on observations of the everyday urban environment and contemporary life. Handmade chains discuss the potential of the chain as a mechanism for understanding ourselves, exploring the social and cultural context of jewellery, and its ongoing life as personal adornment. The connection between the maker and the wearer is a highly valued aspect of making jewellery for Tilden. The work takes on new values once it becomes precious to the wearer, and becomes part of their experience. Tilden turns to the history of the glass buildings of Europe’s industrial age, the Crystal Palace and the Palais des Machines in making the Graded Palais Necklace. Meticulously constructed with sparkling, clear glass and blackened silver, Graded Palais uses gradation to achieve the effect of diminishing perspective. Each repeated component proportionally recedes, translating the architectural elements of these buildings made of glass and steel to human scale.  “It seems interesting that at this time, when modernism’s dreams of the future have become the stuff of our past, Blanche Tilden should recognise in its most utopian moments an idea which still has the power to enchant us: that of a building made of glass. And yet, hers are not emptily nostalgic objects, respectful as they are of the dreams and achievements of designers of the past. Rather, we might read in them a new idea about our relationship with built spaces. At a time when telecommunications allow us to be both more connected to global communities and yet see those communities as nothing more than an aggregate of individualised selves, her structures reverse the traditional idea of a building as an envelope for bodies. Instead, they propose a relationship in which the body carries her structures with it, a sort of talisman for a contemporary nomadic life in which the webs of glass and silver create small prisms of light, not quite material and resonant with our own dreams of other possible futures.” – Anne Brennan Fer et Verre 2010

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